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as it was four years ago. make sure you know that what we are celebrating is not the election or swearing in of a president, what we are doing is celebrating each other. and celebrating this incredible nation that we call home. and after we celebrate, let's make sure to work as hard as we can to pass on an america that is worthy, not only of our past, but also of our future. god bless you. i love you. we will see you tomorrow. [applause] ♪ ["we take care of our own"] ♪ ♪ ["only in america"] ♪ >> as part of our inauguration fightge, the u.s. army's and drum corps -- they will escort president obama down pennsylvania avenue during the inaugural parade. ♪ [drum line] >> it began in april with the production team. it prepares the materials, the music, the drill that we do. parade marching does not require quadrilles, but we do a great deal of research with 18th-century music portrayed on modern instruments that aren't -- that are reminiscent of instruments during the revolutionary war. the rangers a range of vignettes -- are arranged vignettes music from the 18th century that has m
for re-election, the president is free to pursue the agenda that will enshrine him. among america's greats were abe lincoln and thomas jefferson. for this u.s. president, the first african-american ever elected to the office, the historical legacy has already been written before he officially began his first term. four years ago, president barack obama welcomed the weight of that legacy casting himself as a blank canvas to project our lofty hopes for change and great expectations for the nation. the first item on his agenda, that bright legacy and suggested those hopes were well placed. president obama tried and succeeded where previous democratic presidents tried and failed. he enacted legislation that provided universal health care for all americans. four years after the first inauguration our lofty hopes for what was possible have been dragged back down to earth by the cold hand of reality and a republican dominated house of representatives. this time around, our great expectations may feel like managed expectations. take a look at president obama's second term official portrai
as a permanent campaign, where everyday is election day in campaigning and election may make for uncompromising minds. you stand in your principles, mobilize your base, drawing endless amounts of money. 20 for seven new site will cover his politics is that it's a horserace and the horse are on steroids coming in to fund the campaign. but we mean by the uncompromising mindset is a minor that cared towards election and not towards governing. >> host: president gutmann come at you right to chew in your co-author, dennis thompson as we observe the changing scene in american politics, we came to believe the general problem could be addressed by concentrating on a particular institution, the united states congress. why is that? >> guest: if you want to see the problem with the uncompromising mindset, look no further than the 112th congress in washington. gridlock, nothing gets past the least legislation in the last 50 years. why? everybody's campaigning all the time. there's very little by way of relationships across the aisle and we ran up to a break of the debt ceiling crisis in compromise was reac
to washington, you already paid for it. well, this is the day they all voted for. and this country elected this president, elections matter, everyone who went to the polling place went to the trouble of getting involved in this campaign. it's getting the reality of it to come true today. i am curious, i know the president is committed to do something about public safety. we can see that in his heart since newtown. we know he wants to do something on immigration because the there to be fixed and both parties want to deal with it fur all kinds of reasons. i'm waiting to see if there's a halfton in his speech today, something about rebuilding this country. i think this president's instincts are good on war and peace. i hope they are good about building this country. i wish the labor unions and all kinds of people would get out to say, let's do what we did when eisenhower was president, a moderate republican. build this country up, rebuild our highways, our bridges, our big cities and transit systems, inner city transportation, really build up this country with jobs. all this talk about debt,
before women got the right to vote. and now we just had a historic election where there are more women in congress than we have ever had before. it's really an incredible movement, and i work at emily's list, and emily's list has been working on it for 28 years to get more women on the pipeline. and we are picking it up. >> sam, it seems to me that the president was almost like an ich bin ein berliner speech. he's a man of color himself. but to embrace all of this together, i have never heard any of it -- none of this they. there was no they. it was all we, a lot of we. >> keep in mind, i thought the theme was that change can spark from the individual. in all these cases you have change being a grassroots entity, but it has to have a component of the state and government to help foster it, and the line that really stuck out to me was these truths can be self-evident, but they're not self-executing. what he made was a case for why there is an important role for the government to play to basically protect our rights but also to advance us as a society whether it's on climate change, immi
an honorary member after the 1994 election. >> the people that listen to ten hours of talk radio a week or more voted republican by a three-two-one margin. those are the people that elected the new congress. that's why this is the limbaugh congress. >> as of today, i think we can finally put this book where it belongs in history. right there. the american people have put the brakes on the conservative train that has run over a lot of people in this country. president obama has laid down a different track for america. the president's inauguration yesterday served as proof of a real movement in this country. we are a society now of tolerance, fairness, and acceptance. the country is not afraid of progressive values, or to say the word, liberal, because most of the country believes in progressive liberal values. a majority of americans believe gay marriage should be legal. most people don't want any cuts whatsoever to social security. even more people want medicare left alone. only 33% want to protect defense spending. on immigration, the majority believes, well, the path for citizenship f
lincoln's election and a number of 1860 to his inauguration in march, 1861. during this time the president was pressured by republicans and democrats throughout the country to maintain the union. it's a little over an hour. >> welcome to the virtual book signing here at the abraham lincoln bookshop as always. i'm daniel weinberg and i am pleased to have you here. it is a lincoln civil war book signing at work. it's a wonderful way for you to build a first edition signed library with all of the books coming out over the next few years in the lincoln bicentennial which is upon us but also the war that follows the heels there are so many books coming out and we are going to try to weed through them and have the authors on the show so you can see the best research going and also you have to weed out others that you don't have to have always. there are too many books out there. >> i say that as a book dealer we adjust them for book signings and that is what distinguishes us. if you are watching live, we encourage you to do questions and we will try to get them on air and have them answered for
in the past election. host: on twitter -- james in dickinson, texas, democratic caller. caller: good morning. that was a great speech that the president and vice president spoke yesterday. i have been watching it ever since it came on. i want to say hello to my pastor at the baptist church. i'm sure he's listening, and to all the church members. host: a little bit more from president obama's speech yesterday, talking about defending democracy abroad. [video clip] >> we still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. [[cheers and applause] our brave men and women in uniform tempered by the flames of battle are unmatched in skill and courage. our citizens, feared by the memory of those we have lostthoseknow too well the price it has paid for liberty. the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm. but we are also heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war. we have turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends and we must carry those lessons into this time as well. we will defend our people and
the election. andrew jackson was first sworn in on the east side of the capitol building and ronald reagan the first on the west. the shortest inauguration dress was george washington's second. six presidents have taken the oath outside washington. george washington first in new york, and then in philadelphia. john adams in philadelphia. chester arthur in new york. teddy roosevelt in buffalo. calvin coolidge in plymouth, vermont, and l.b.j. in dallas. james polk's inauguration was the first to be covered using the telegraph and war enharding's parade was the first to use cars. buchanan's inauguration was the first one photographed and william mckin le's was the first filmed. hoover's was the first in a movie newsreel. the first to be televised was harry truman and the first streams in the internets was bill clinton's second. lincoln's parade was the first to include african-americans acknowledged wilson's was the first to include women. bad weather moved some indoors. grants touched it out in 16 degrees and jack kennedy in 20 degrees without an overcoat. f.d.r.'s inauguration was the first
characteristic of a lot of our work. but we feel it was necessary. >> host: thomas mann, did the 2012 elections clarify anything? >> guest: by all appearances it was a status quo election returning us to the division of power; obama in the white house, democrats in control of the senate, republicans of the house. but appearances can be deceiving and in this case are. the most important reality of the election is that the republican effort to oppose anything and everything proposed by obama almost like a parliamentary party was not rewarded. taking the debt ceiling hostage was not rewarded, calling the obama health care plan -- which was their own only a few years earlier -- socialism was not reward withed. rewarded. that means they have to begin to rethink themselves and, importantly, democrats will not automatically embrace the same tactics in opposition. so i think that was the important change that creates a new dynamic not that's going to solve our problems. there's going to be no sitting around the campfire in washington making nice to one another. but the possibility now exists for a real
. to gender quotas exist for increasing women elected to government bodies? at a public education programs conducted by the state to emphasize the importance of balance representation in all elected bodies and so on? i condemned they are not universal human rights. they have little to do with equality of opportunity. they're they are essentially a partisan political positions of western progressives of the western left. come off as universal human rights. in the u.n. monitoring committee to france in 2000 make company said you're doing a good job unpolitical pairing. 50% of candidates for municipal elections is good. but you don't have 50% of women on corporate boards or financial institutions. surveys suggest instituting financial sanctions against companies that did not address these differences. the u.n. committee went to germany 2004, demanded that the federal government had conduct a study on my fathers are not without and to parental leave. it's not just a state policy. it's a national policy. there's not many men taking advantage. why is in a quick sweat as you and start having a qu
. >> no law varying from the services of representatives shall take effect until the election of representatives -- you can't pass a law about your pay during that congress. >> with great respect to the congressman here, i'm not an elected official. what i hear him saying is we have a very difficult budget situation. and therefore, we have to go full speed into total dysfunction. and i just don't see how those pieces add up. i mean, if you're really serious about trying to do something about the deficit, which is a long-term problem, versus the economy. in fact, all that messing around with the debt ceiling, all that does is threaten to raise the interest rates, it makes things much worse. if you want to talk about stabilizing the debt, which i would hope you and i would agree would be a goal then we have to talk about raising $1.2 trillion over the next two years, because we have over a trillion in the bank through spending cuts and tax increases. that 1.2 trillion is not that heavy a lift with a functional congress. but we can't get there if we're playing around with this cr
to do which is represent the people of the united states. we have a democratically elected republic and people need to pull out their history books and find out what that is and realize that when we send them to office, would give them the authority to vote the way we feel and if we feel they are not representing our opinions and needs, we need to replace them. thank you very much. host: stephen dinan will be joining us at the bottom of the hour. later, author and historian richard norton smith will dig in the details of the second term and what this president could be facing. this headline is from "the washington examiner" -- the public information officer for the u.s. capitol police is joining us on the fund. guest: for having me. host: we look at the seams around washington, what can visitors expect tomorrow? guest: they should expect that we will do our best to protect people. give time to get through lines and things of that nature. host: this is a map we found this morning in "the washington post." the area in red it will be the high-security area. many of the roads around the
. the challenge to us is to remember what we learned when we first entered this movement, that you never elect someone to make change happen for you. you elect somebody to make it a little easier for your movement to keep on making change after. and so, brothers and sisters, i implore you tonight, have a good time, party caressed well, then get right back on the battlefield tuesday morning because we took our democracy back and we ain't giving it up to nobody. thank you and god bless. fire it up. fire it up. fire it up! god bless you all. >> that was president of the naacp, benjamin jealous, speaking at the peace ball, voices of hope and resistance come here in washington, d.c. on sunday night. we will be back with more from the peace ball couldn't angela davis, sonia sanchez and others in a moment. ♪ [music break] >> sweet honey in the rock performing at the peace ball last night. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are broadcasting from washington, d.c., bringing you special coverage of today's inauguration as hundreds of thousands gath
hello, tom. it is exciting times in tripoli. with election and new congress coming together. as i read libya's recent history it is a bit like we are reliving the post world war ii years. how right he was. that was chris. always thinking, always sharp, always ready. public service is too often looked down upon by some in this country. often my colleagues in the foreign service la meant they don't make them the way they used to anymore. today we remember a man, chris stevens, whose life and service just proves how wrong my colleagues really are. chris shows us they still make them the way they used to, only an awful lot better, thank you. [applause] >> chris's family would like to invite everyone to a reception after the ceremony. it will be held over there. you are all welcome. let us pray. oh lord, support us all the day long until the shadows lengthen and the evening comes and the busy world is hushed and the fever of life is over and our work is done. then in your mercy grant us a safe lodging and a holy rest and peace at the last. may the author of all life bless us and keep us. in
of james junior elected mayor of san francisco in 1912. he didn't have a city hall because it was destroyed in the earth wake of 1906. construction began in april of 1913. in december 1915, the building was complete. it opened it's doors in january 1916. >> it's a wonderful experience to come to a building built like this. the building is built as a palace. not for a king or queen. it's built for all people. this building is beautiful art. those are architecture at the time when city hall was built, san francisco had an enormous french population. therefore building a palace in the art tradition is not unusual. >> jimmie was an incredible individual he knew that san francisco had to regain it's place in the world. he decided to have the tallest dome built in the united states. it's now stands 307 feet 6 inches from the ground 40 feet taller than the united states capital. >> you could spend days going around the building and finding something new. the embellishment, the carvings, it represents commerce, navigation, all of the things that san francisco is famous for. >> the wood you see
it was unanimous that george washington had been elected president. the first thing they had to doffs notify washington he needed to come to take his oath of office. it took a little while for presidents of the united states in those days to get to wherever the federal government was so they had a couple of weeks to work things out. well the first thing they did was to write an oath for everybody else to take including the vice president of the united states. congress write it is oath that every other person who works for the government from military to judges to the legitimate tors. that is an oath written by congress and it's changed over the centuries. but the oath the president takes is unique. it's in the constitution and it's never changed. so the question was where are we going to swear in the president of the united states? well congress is meeting in federal hall on wall street. and it was a nice building. the house had the bigger room downstairs and the senate had the smaller room upstairs. and they said the president should be sworn in in our chamber. that was fine except everybod
. the pre we realize the president won the election and i -- so i think to some degree it was a recognition that for us to have a debateav about spending and debt we'vewe got to have the focus be on a and wha budget and what we're going to achieve a balanced budget over time. >> pelley: and that's why thee republicans have attached a caveat to their debt ceiling bill. they want senate democrats to do something they haven't done since 2009: pass a budget putting them on the record about to spend how much they want to spend next year and on what, scott. >> pelley: nancy, thank you. major garrett told us a momentrrett to ago the president cited the newtown tragedy in his inaugural his ina address and calling for new gun control measures but did thees but d president change any mindsge any m today? we ask we asked elaine quijano to find out. >> reporter: south philadelphia high school is in one of the toughest parts of the city. every one of principal otis toug hackney's students must pass through these metal detectors. you want to see tighter gun control measures?es >> most definitely. >> rep
for office. they need money. you won't win an election if you are responsible for stopping even a week's worth of social security checks. there won't be any wrangling. pin the tail on the gop and despite the disfunction in the party, within the gop, it's vital donors not be turned off. that's what the business of politics is all about. the gop is no longer beholden to big corporations and is embracing and being supported by small businesses. enough. as someone who has been a small businessman all his life, started many businesses, let me say these articles are stupid and nonsensical. here is the dirty little secret of small business that all of us who tried our hand of starting a small business, i wish it would get into the media's conscious. small business needs big business to do well, if it's going to do well itself. big business hires, grows, puts people to work. small business caters locally to the big business. let me explain how local businesses would love to be as independent as some politicians seem to believe. we all know better. the inn i own in summit, new jersey. a bunch o
having been re-elected, having been reaffirmed by the american people in the role as the first family in an odd way we were voting on them as first family. and the american people said, you know what? we may disagree with him on policy and we don't trust him on social security, whatever, but we kind of like that family. we kind of trust that family, and that's -- >> how did they do it? >> by working very hard at being normal. >> right. >> as joy said, stylish, but normal. and i think to see them so comfortable now is a reflection not only of them but of the country. whatever else you want to say, whatever other arguments we're going to have about entitlements, about war, about medicare, about medicaid, it's not going to be about having an african-american first family because they have done it so beautifully. and by the way, to have walked the tightrope of race the way they have, having come up as baby boomers in the affirmative action era when people thought, hey, wait a minute, maybe they don't deserve it, they've got to prove themselves, barack and michelle have proved themselves i
, the dow has been up 600 points since election day, and we have seen a very tumultous time in terms of talking about the u.s. economy and certain folks wanting to perhaps hold it hostage. what is that -- what is that counter indication? what does that mean? >>. >> here's the good news. the good news is i think a lot of executives now have decided that they're actually just going to have to live with fiscal cliffs. we're going to have a series of them, and that this is the new normal, as you would say, and that they're just -- it's like the weather. now maybe it's raining, maybe it's not, but we'll have to live with, it and to the extent there's more confidence, i think it's sort of -- there's been a come to jesus moment that this is sort of how it's going to be. whether that's the right thing or wrong thing, i don't know. also, that there seems to be a lot more support here in europe for the economy and a sense that things are actually getting better, a sense that maybe austerity doesn't work, which is a real shift, and, by the way, is a real shift in terms of how republicans are go
another term and how the election results for our closest ally in the middle east could affect the region. >> plus what it means for an impending showdown with iran. we'll go inent did and...what!!?? an article that says a typical family pays $155,000 in "wall street" fees on their 401(k)s? seriously? seriously. you don't believe it? search it, "401k 155k." then go to e-trade. and roll over your old 401(k)s to a new e-trade retirement account. we have every type of retirement account. none of them ch and all of them offer low cost investments. why? becae we're not your typical wall street firm, that's why. so you keep more of your money. e-trade. less for us. more for you. uma: fox news alert. firefighters on the scene of a three-alarm fire. that is in a three-store residence in lin, massachusetts. this is 10 miles north of downtown boston. firefighters are on the scene battling the blaze. we will have more details as we get them. jon: a brand new study links the use of aspirin to an increase risk of blindness. risk is live at the breaking news desk with that. rick? >> this is an importan
on what should be done. but you have obviously probably more than any group of elect officials, thought about this issue more intently and longer. you've done great deal of work on this, all you've who deal with the issue every day. i'm not going to ask for a show of hands but i bed if i did a lot of people would put the hand up: how many of you mayors have had to attend the funeral of a police officer or an innocent child in a drive-by shooting or a shop owner in your city. many of you have had to attend, and some of you many, too many, such funerals. some of you represent communities that hear experienced mass shootings, not just in schools but in movie theaters and temples, and it's not unique to big cities and urban areas, as we now know. it was pure companiens dense i happened to be literally probably turn out to be a quarter mile ', back in 2006, at an outing, when i heard gunshots in thewoods that we didn't know -- we thought they were hunters. got back to the clubhouse and saw helicopters. it was a shooting that had just taken place in a small amish -- small -- small amie, scho
a lot of work. one of the most challenging parts of the new district supervisor is that we elect the supervisors by district. it is very important to pay attention to the district, be engaged in the projects in the district. we also represent the whole city. any district supervisor that focuses on the district without addressing the citywide issues is not doing his or her job. every day, i make sure i am working on the major citywide issues and the district issues. i try to be disciplined about that. >> how will you approach the tough choices? >> i think we have to start by looking at the most critical city services that we cannot do without. what are the ones that if they deteriorated, we will pay the price on? public safety falls into that category as a basic critical service. transportation, making sure we have the functional muni is critical. core public health services like dealing with mental on this on our streets -- with mental illness on our streets. if we do not provide services, we will pay the price. it works out from there in terms of budget priorities. >> with your
look at immigration. those were the pieces of the coalition that really gave him the election so he was saying in many ways he's going to stand up for the very things he ran on. >> the things he ran on, the things he won on. and when you look at sort of the victory model, the formula that went into the 2012 victory for obama, that's the future of the democratic party and future of america. if the republican party wants to succeed again at the national level, they will have to make inroads to the groups. and here's president obama saying not only did i campaign on these groups but now it's time for me to deliver on these groups. and if they don't meet that challenge -- begin to meet that challenge in some way, all of these groups could be lost to them permanently. >> now, last night on the show, i talked about how there was good reviews, but i didn't think it would last. and before i could get out of the studio, they started -- the republicans -- taking shots. let me show you where respective paul ryan responded to the president's takers comment at the inaugural address. >> no one is
a former n.r.a. member? caller: the day after the presidential election, i was contacted by the n.r.a. -- if you know anything about the n.r.a., if you are a member, they do contact you quite often, mail, via phone calls, asking for money. and more money. and while i still support the n.r.a.'s positions on defending some of our rights, i also saw them as one of the largest and most powerful lobbies and the fact that they couldn't defeat president obama, at that point, i'm not throwing good money after bad, and i just decided that i wasn't going to support their financial effort anymore. host: i abottle guise for interrupting. you are a gun owner and treated for depression. caller: i am trited for depression and i haven't read the president's entire proposal veer bait im, but i just want to caution the government to take a look at this -- first of all, as a man, i'm going to tell you it's difficult for me to go to a health care professional to ever address my profession. i knew for years i was depressed, but i thought it was something i could man up, power through, get through, tak
and a number of senators as well. and to ask him directly about the elections and ask him about my second question. but i wanted to get your sense of where you see those lexes going. what efforts you can undertake to make sure that they are free and fair because they've been, i think, central to the next chapter in this transition. i just wanted to comment on that. the second question as it relates to afghanistan is one that senator boxer raised and her work on this has been exemplary, on women and girls and in particular, i have a -- an amendment that we got through the national defense authorization act which would require both state and defense to file a report on the efforts to promote the security of afghan women and girls just by way of itemization monitoring and responding to changes in women's security that will be part of the report. secondly, improving gender sensitivity and responsiveness among the afghan security forces and increasing the recruitment and retention of women in the afghan security forces. so both with regard to the election and women and girls. >> senator with r
. >> good afternoon. i am the first elected of newtown, the scene of the most horrific event that took place at sandy hook elementary school in which we lost 26 children and staff members. i am here to show support for those initiatives late out today by vice president biden and president obama. both of those members said our world has changed because of what happened at sandy hook. par contest as has been raised. we have the obligation to address. if that is so, change will take place. i would hate to find myself a year from now reading about another of that -- another event. i truly believe the will of the people make a difference. i am calling on everyone to have the courage to stand up and help us make that difference. we should never again visit a tragedy such as we had in newtown. i call on everyone of you as mothers and fathers and members of a reasonable society to know it is time for us to make a change. please do everything you can to support common sense policies. we need to know that we are the answer to this problem. thank you. >> hi, i'm president of the brady campaign. i come
back, fdr broke the unwritten code of serving more than two terms. he was elected to four terms. in today's modern age, could we have more than two terms for any president? guest: great question. >> you worked for ronald reagan. if his health was better, of course, would he have run for a third term? guest: i doubt it. he talked about it after he left office. he was going to campaign for appeal of that amendment. he thought the american people should be able to vote for anyone wanted to vote for. it is very difficult to imagine after eight years of office -- we've used up our presidents. that is why this string of two- term presidents is really so unusual. we have a string of one-term presidencies before that. that became the norm. host: let me share with ronald reagan said in january of 1987. state of union address. there was the iran-contra sc andal. [video clip] >> i have one major regret. i took a risk with our action in regards to iran. it did not work. for that, i accept full responsibility. it was not wrong to try to save lives. certainly, it was not wrong to try to secur
that they could provide whoever hillary clinton's prospective opponent might be in a presidential election, provide them with footage they can use in attack ads. instead, hillary clinton gave herself a highlight reel by spanking the senators pretty forcefully there. they came off as unserious. she came off as very serious. >> you bring up senator johnson. i want to bring up that exchange. it seemed to be the most heated of the day. >> the american people could have known that within days and they didn't know that. >> with all due respect, the fact is we had four dead americans. was it because of a protest or guys out for a walk who decided to kill some americans? what difference at this point does it make? it's our job to figure out what happened and do everything we can to prevent it from ever happening again, senator. >> show everybody the cover of the "new york post" today that says no wonder bill's afraid. joy ann, i want to start with you on this one. they capture that moment in time there. again, as i said, it got heated during that exchange, but you would not see a man put in that p
should be done. but you have probably more than any group of elected officials thought about this issue more intently and longer. you have done a great deal of work on this. all of you who deal with the issue every day. i'm not going to ask for a show of hands, but if i did, a lot of people would put their hands up in this room. how many of you mayors attended the funeral of a police officer or an innocent child in a drive-by shooting or shop owner in your city? many of you, many of you have had to attend and many of you, many, many funerals. some of your communities experienced mass shootings, not just in schools, but movie theaters and temples and not unique to big cities. it was -- i happened to be literally, probably turned out to be a quarter of a mile back in 2006 at an outing when i heard gunshots in the woods that we didn't know where we thought there were hunters. i got back to the clubhouse in this outing and saw helicopters. it was a shooting that had just taken place in a small amish school just outside of lancaster, pennsylvania. so it's not just big cities or well-to-do su
during the election was the time when obama had to come houston and talk explicitly about race. >> host: in philadelphia. >> guest: right here in philadelphia. one of the ironies -- so many ironies but one of the powerful ones is the first black president actually is a person who can talk least about race. for him it's a third rail for everyone, it's the third, fourth, and philadelphia rail for him. there's something about race he knows he can't discuss, and part of what he tried to do in that moment was to say, let me say something i think is going to bring people together that is forward thinking and hopefully i'll never have to bring it up again. in some ways it's paranoia. the idea is americans for fatigued about race. so resistant to thinking about racial inclusion, that to even bring up the idea of race too often, folks are going to disqualify you from the highest office in the land and you're not going to be a president for all americans. the positive is there are ways to address all kinds of differences that don't invoke race but brings everyone in. that's a nice model. we don't
any group of elected officials thought about this issue more intently and longer. you get a great deal of work. all of you deal with the issue every day. i'm not going to ask for a show of hands, but i benefited off a lot of people who put their hands up in this room. if i were to say how many of you plan to attend a funeral of a police officer or innocent child in a drive-by shooting or shop owner in your city, many of you come in many of you have had to attend and some of you, too many such funerals. some of you that communities have experienced my shootings not just in schools, but movie theaters and temples and it's not big cities or urban areas as we now know. it was for your comments and insight happen to be literally probably turn out to be a quarter of a mile back in 2006 at an outing when i heard gunshots in the words that we didn't know -- we thought they were hunters. we got back to the clubhouse and saw helicopters. it was issued in better had just taken place -- excuse me, a small amish school outside pennsylvania. so it's not just big cities for new suburbs. it can happen
's liberal agenda on gun control. jon: -pt president doesn't have to run for office again. he's won re-election. he has four years to get done what he wants to do. we heard in the inaugural address that he seems to have moved -- well he seems to be pushing some more liberal positions than he espoused earlier. you have senators like tim johnson of south dakota. mark udall of colorado, maryland drew of lashes all of the democratic senators, all of them from states that do not favor increasing restrictions on john sales. >> then also you have members of congress that are up for re-election, and some of these are blue dog democrats. when people go to the polls if they do not vote their conscience and vote for their constituents, people at the polls are going to give them pain of defeat. when it comes to god in certain states and when it comes to guns people do not go against the grain of what they believe in. so i think that the dscc and harry reid should stand firm and not follow the president's liberal agenda on this. but you do have a strong gun lobby in washington d.c., those mountainses for gu
, saying you can't just be involved during the the election, you've got to be involved in the big issues after the election and what his aides say following what republicans say about the bad signs they're seeing about how l, take ident is pushing a listen. >> we have on immigration, gun safety, deficit reduction, methods for the economy, and we've got a pretty stacked agenda and urgency in the country to address it. >> what i don't think is constructive what the president is doing, within minutes of that horrible tragedy in newtown, the president began trying to exploit that tragedy to push a gun control agenda that's designed to appeal to partisans, designed to appeal to his political partisans. >> you rather freshman republican ted cruz suggesting that the president has been trying to take advantage of the newtown tragedy and the white house aides previously denied that. what is interesting is that some of those divisive details about gun control, immigration reform, we're told by aides at the white house will not come up tomorrow and the president will try to do the broad bush and fo
the recent election results that they need to get healthy with hispanic voter. they were way on the downside of that growing constituency. very important in swing states out in the west part of the united states, as well as in florida and some of the east coast states, as well. so that is going to push them to the bargaining table on the issue of immigration. he's got less of an auspicious landscape in front of him on issues like energy and climate change. and of course on guns which is an issue that events have pushed to the forefront. he's going to have a rough time getting that priority through the congress. >> you mention immigration being one of those big-ticket items, of course, health care was the signature big-ticket item of the first term. what else is on the list this time around? >> well, he's got immigration, he's got overseeing the implementation of the health care law which, of course, hasn't really fully taken effect. he's got energy and climate which is really the big undone story from the first term. he did not get that cap and trade bill. and he's not going to get it which
four, five years ago the president of the us u then senator, promised if elected, by the end of my first term, i'm going to cut that first deficit in half. we didn't hear anything about that yesterday. in fact, it sounded more like spend, spend, spend, and in fact, if you're just waking up, you were sleeping through the speech yesterday, the main speech point was whatever you need, middle class, we're going to give it to you. >> brian: education, roads, communication, networks, science, labs, a lot of investment in infrastructure, which means investment infrastructure means do you need revenue? to get revenue, you raise taxes. >> gretchen: you lint like what he was talking about, maybe you liked that it was short. under 20 minutes. we heard that one president in history gave a two-hour speech. >> brian: and he died. >> steve: he did. >> gretchen: he did soon after of pneumonia. let's talk about that whole idea of the middle class, though, because these are the facts, folks. the median household income in 2007 was $54,489. of course, that was before the banks collapsed and before th
with their elected officials. i wanted to make the book accessible and i had recommendations to help them do that. >> the former head of the federal deposit insurance corporation on the government's role during the crisis. her book is "bull by the horns," sunday night on "q &a." >> [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [video clip] "washington journal"is next. the conversation on reducing gun violence continues. we will ask a gun owners to call in during the first hour and the round table and possible new gun laws. laws.
's family, if you want to attack the candidate or the elected official, certainly that's your prerogative but generally family has been considered off limits, and that doesn't add anything to legitimate dialogue that really needs to take place on the issues of public safety and gun regulations. >> although some people are also criticizing president obama for surrounding himself with children, when he held his news conference on his gun control plans yesterday. should children be used in that instance? >> i don't think those children were "used." they were there at an event, they wrote letters to the president. he talked about the letters that they wrote. they're very concerned that something as horrific as newtown, connecticut, or things that happened on the streets in philadelphia, chicago, new york, washington, any city in america, could possibly happen to them, and i thought the president gave them a voice in this conversation. often the adults seem to forget that children care about these issues as well. >> but you know, some might argue that the children didn't actually need to be pr
, the president owes his re-election to latinos and women, so a small mention of them would probably go a long way. >> reporter: thank you, we'll stay in touch with you, a lot of logistical problems, let's hope they don't take place. >> we sure do, the inauguration speech and what the president will say, so much more ahead [ male announcer ] when we built the cadillac ats from the ground up to be the world's best sport sedan... ♪ ...people noticed. ♪ the all-new cadillac ats -- 2013 north american car of the year. ♪ for a limited time, take advantage of this exceptional offer on the all-new cadillac ats. email marketing from constant contact reaches people in a place they're checking every day -- their inbox. and it gives you the tools to create custom emails that drive business. it's just one of the ways constant contact can help you grow your small business. sign up for your free trial today at constantcontact.com/try. . >>> what would you say to sasha and malia? do you have a message to them? >> i would say thank you, because they have to -- well, their dad is the president, and they have
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